Growing Your Network

Source: Every business needs a support network it can turn to for advice, to help grow its market presence, and provide referrals. Every step in growing your small business network will require you to invest into relationships with potential clients, vendors, employees, and community advocates. So, where do you start?

It is critical to your business’s growth and health that you establish a network of support around you. Every small business needs to have a legion of community advocacy on its side when the business environment becomes hostile. Some of your flow of client referrals may come from other business owners you have developed a relationship with over time, who do not offer the same services as your business. In the event your business experiences a disruption, who are the fellow colleagues in the business community that you can turn to in order to keep your business on track? It’s vital to establish and maintain positive relationships within the industry or business community, for two things will come out of it: resources and opportunities.

A business grows and thrives on building relationships with people. It is very important to join or be part of a business or community network. Joining either a trade organization or a local chamber of commerce will allow your business to outreach towards experienced mentors who have “been there and done that” in the business world. This provides you the luxury of learning from their mistakes and successes.

Joining a business or trade organization will lend your business instant credibility. Most consumers view the lone wolf as such that, a predator out to take their money. However, when a business joins an organization, it usually must qualify under a vetting process that deems the business and its owner credible. You can make personal connections with people, some who may offer client referrals, and in turn you may have clients you cannot serve, and will need to send them somewhere.

Having a network will increase your purchasing power. You can get better group rates if multiple business owners come together to join in using a shared services model to source things like health care or office supplies. Many business organizations or trade groups have preferred vendors which they refer to for business liability insurance, financing, or other business to business services, which may cater their expertise to a specific industry or geographic area.

When building any business relationship, the goal in mind should be to create a mutual or greater value exchange. Whether it is the exchange of ideas, or client referrals or vendor referrals, keep in mind, time is money, and to waste a person’s time without an equal or greater value exchange is to also waste their money as well as your own. Business relationships should be reviewed as long-term. Just because you met someone today or had a discussion with a new business contact today, does not mean they are obligated to you in any way, unless of course you and the other party sign a contract. You must approach each relationship with a pure intention that what you offer will uplift or enhance their life or business in one shape or form.

So where do you go to join? There are local business organizations and trade groups which are a good place to start. I suggest researching your local Chamber of Commerce. This is the place where business owners, politics and community all come together. Chamber of Commerce offers several opportunities to network with other businesses, which is also your audience if your business sells to other businesses. The Chamber of Commerce is an educational resource for your business as they will be able to connect you to information on how to acclimate your business within the local community. Also, the Chamber offers opportunities to connect with the community though a myriad of local events open to the public, giving businesses an opportunity to showcase their products or services to the general local public.

Organizations such as the National Small Business Association, National Federation of Independent Businesses, and National Small Business Association are small business trade organizations that blend solving industry issues with community advocacy to leadership in government. These organizations allow for businesses to network with each other and provide a voice for small businesses collectively, as well as on behalf of small businesses concerning regulatory matters and legislation that will either help or hurt the small business owner.

So how do you build a relationship with the community around you? Community outreach should be a priority when mapping out your marketing and advertising campaign and budget. Not all community outreach costs money. Sometimes it involves investing your time. Rotary Club, Kiwanis, Elks Lodge, and the VFW-American Legion are staples in the community. They are organizations led by local business owners and community leaders that perform good works aimed at uplifting the community. Through your service in one of these organizations, you will get to develop relationships with other people who will recognize your dedication to help others.

Some businesses take the lead by organizing a community activity. 5K runs are a very popular way to get people to gather together for a good cause. The money raised can be donated to charity, and you have plenty of opportunities to get your business name in front of people, leading up to, during, and after the event. As the host and main sponsor, your business name and contact information would be placed on all the event’s marketing materials, sign up forms, social media, and mentioned during the event. You can have a team staffing a booth or table of information made available to racers and supporters.

Another role your business can play in growing its network is becoming a member of a community activist group. This can be tricky because some community activism is driven by political agendas, and so it is important to not push an agenda or get involved with any group that requires you to vacate your personal values or alienates your clients. If you’re a business that caters to female clientele like a beauty parlor, you may choose to help a community activist group that supports women who are victims of domestic violence. If your business is in the environmental industry, you may want to take up cause with a group that advocates for better environmental practices.

Wherever you choose to build relationships, make sure that you are joining because in your heart you want to make a difference, want to help others and effectively uplift the community around you. If you volunteer or join a business organization or trade group with the intent that it’s all about what you can get out of someone else, your actions, words and mannerisms will speak out for your wrong intentions and people will take notice. Building a community and network goes hand in hand in lending your time, expertise, and sometimes financial resources in serving others. Remember, you get back what you give.

Samuel K. Burlum is an investigative reporter who authors articles related to economic development, innovation, green technology, business strategy, and public policy concerns. Burlum is also a career entrepreneur who lends his expertise as a consultant to start-up companies, small businesses, and mid-size enterprises, providing advisement in several areas including strategic business planning, business development, supply chain management, and systems integration. He is also author of The Race to Protect Our Most Important Natural Resource-Water, Main Street Survival Guide for Small Businesses, and Life in the Green Lane-in Pursuit of the American Dream.

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The History of Senior Health Care in Manawa

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Written by Samuel K. Burlum, Investigative Reporter and Author

Manawa Community Living Center was originally founded and built in 1971 as a retirement-nursing home. In the early days of senior care, there was not much regard for privacy, individual patient quarters, or special amenities, for Manawa Community Nursing Center (then known as) was a 60 bed unit with three patients to a room. The facility remained much the same for over fourty years until the Castlebergs (originally from Wood County, Wisconsin); purchased the facility in June of 2011.

The Manawa Community Living Center would undergo a major renovation, which included bathrooms, dining facilities, every individual patient and resident room; visitation rooms; and administrative offices. All of the buildings core systems including heating/air conditioning, safety and sprinklers-fire prevention, plumbing, and safety and security alarm systems, water received major upgrades and/or were replaced, bringing the building into compliance, meeting today’s strict local, state, and federal building standards and codes. Well over $700,000 was reinvested into Manawa Community Living Center, as small improvements to curbside appeal are ongoing.

“We wanted to create an environment in which promoted wellness and positive health; a facility that would be worthy of memorializing the lives of each individual that would come through these doors and call Manawa their next home,” —-Phil Castleberg, proprietor.

“We utilized all local contractors, labor, vendors, and suppliers, to demonstrate our commitment to the community that we were serious about investing our financial resources in local business development, added Castleberg, “Having a local supply chain to provide us our needs in our renovation was very important to us.”

Manawa Community Living Center today accommodates just 15 nursing home beds and 10 assisted living beds. Each room has been totally renovated, retrofitted with private bathroom facilities and upgraded decor. Located at 400 East Fourth Street, the Manawa Community Living Center is now a cornerstone of the community of Manawa.

“We downsized the number of beds to just one patient per room. It was our objective to provide personal care and quarters for each resident, allowing for seniors who needed special care and services to receive them in a dignified manner.”

Castleberg continued, “We spared no expense to recreate the experience one would have in their youth of visiting say a bed and breakfast. Manwa is more than a nursing home or assisting living facility; Manawa is a place which individuals in their golden years whom have lost their ability of mobility can still relive the memories of their youth. We welcome the faithful traveler of life…”

Manawa Community Living Center offers multiple services under one roof, including nursing services, assisted living, rehabilitation, occupational therapy, respite care, and hospice care. Manawa not only provides all of the traditional amenities, but it is one of the first its industry to institute multi-media two-way information-communication technology as part of its practice; connecting staff, residents, and family regardless of their location. This new system allows for staff to release the latest news, updates, information, and emergency alerts to residents and families of patients direct to their mobile device.

Manawa recently adopted its Employee Creed, with the core focus and mission of Manawa in uplifting its residents and patients to the best quality of life it can offer.

“We are absolutely devoted to the health and well-being of our residents. We consider them respected members of the community and will offer them nothing less than the highest level of dignity, honor, grace, and love when they are under our care. We have created a different kind of senior care facility, which extends far beyond the building itself; it’s an attitude and culture where people are first, profits are second, and peace rules all…that is the Manawa Difference,” Castleberg concluded.

In 2013, Manawa Community Living Center (then known as Manawa Community Nursing Center) received a 3-star rating (out of five) from CMS of Department of Health and Human Services, on April 24th. This score means that Manawa Community Living Center slightly above average overall based on health inspections, nursing home staff, and quality measures.

The City of Manawa was originally founded in 1871, with the City officially named in 1874. Manawa relied mainly on the timber industry and local agriculture for its economic development. Today, almost 1400 people call Manawa home, and maintains a strong Main Street presence. More about Manawa can be found here: http://cityofmanawa.org/

Samuel K. Burlum is an investigative reporter who authors articles related to economic development, innovation, green technology, business strategy, and public policy concerns. Burlum is also a career entrepreneur who lends his expertise as a consultant to start-up companies, small businesses, and mid-size enterprises, providing advisement in several areas including strategic business planning, business development, supply chain management, and systems integration. He is also author of The Race to Protect Our Most Important Natural Resource-Water, Main Street Survival Guide for Small Businesses, and Life in the Green Lane-in Pursuit of the American Dream.

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